For every beginning there is an ending

Conundrums to Guess

Listed below are the beginnings to eight short stories, written by fairly well known authors. Below that, are the endings to the eight stories. Below that, is a list containing the titles of the story as well as the author. The challenge? Figure out which beginning belongs with which ending, as well as the title of the story.

Beginnings

  • Coal all spent; the bucket empty, the shovel useless; the stove breathing out cold; the room freezing; the leaves outside the window rigid, covered with rime; the sky a silver shield against anyone who looks for help from it.
  • The high grey-flannel fog of winter closed off the Salinas Valley from the sky and from all the rest of the world.
  • During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher.
  • There was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck.
  • When the baby was almost ready to be born, something went wrong and my mother had to go to the hospital two weeks before the expected time.
  • “The marvellous thing is that it’s painless,” he said. “That’s how you know when it starts.”
  • The grandmother didn’t want to go to Florida. She wanted to visit some of her connections in east Tennessee and she was seizing at every chance to change Bailey’s mind.
  • The bell rang furiously and, when Miss Parker went to the tube, a furious voice called out in a piercing North of Ireland accent: “Send Farrington here!”

Endings

  • Outside the tent the hyena made the same strange noise that had awakened her. But she did not hear him for the beating of her heart.
  • “Shut up, Bobby Lee,” The Misfit said. “It’s no real pleasure in life.”
  • “It will be enough if we can have wine. It will be plenty.” She turned up her coat collar so he could not see that she was crying weakly – like an old woman.
  • “But, poor devil, poor devil, he’s best gone out of a life where he rides his rocking horse to find a winner.”
  • “Oh Pa!” he cried. “Don’t beat me, Pa! And I’ll… I’ll say a Hail Mary for you… I’ll say a Hail Mary for you Pa, if you don’t beat me… I’ll say a Hail Mary…”
  • I could not really comprehend these things, but I sensed their strangeness, their disarray. I felt that whatever God might love in this world, it was certainly not order.
  • “You bad woman! I begged you for a shovelful of the worst coal and you would not give me it.” And with that I ascend into the regions of the ice mountains and am lost forever.
  • …and the deep and dank tarn at my feet closed sullenly and silently over the fragments of the House of Usher.

Titles and Authors

  • The Fall of the House of Usher – Edgar Allen Poe
  • Counterparts – James Joyce
  • The Bucket-Rider – Franz Kafka
  • The Rocking-Horse Winner – D.H. Lawrence
  • The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Ernest Hemingway
  • The Chrysanthemums – John Steinbeck
  • A Good Man Is Hard to Find – Flannery O’Connor
  • To Set Our House in Order – Margaret Laurence

Answers after the jump.

Answers to For every beginning there is an ending

The Fall of the House of Usher – Edgar Allen Poe

Beginning: During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher.

Ending: …and the deep and dank tarn at my feet closed sullenly and silently over the fragments of the House of Usher.

Counterparts – James Joyce

Beginning: The bell rang furiously and, when Miss Parker went to the tube, a furious voice called out in a piercing North of Ireland accent: “Send Farrington here!”

Ending: “Oh Pa!” he cried. “Don’t beat me, Pa! And I’ll… I’ll say a Hail Mary for you… I’ll say a Hail Mary for you Pa, if you don’t beat me… I’ll say a Hail Mary…”

The Bucket-Rider – Franz Kafka

Beginning: Coal all spent; the bucket empty, the shovel useless; the stove breathing out cold; the room freezing; the leaves outside the window rigid, covered with rime; the sky a silver shield against anyone who looks for help from it.

Ending: “You bad woman! I begged you for a shovelful of the worst coal and you would not give me it.” And with that I ascend into the regions of the ice mountains and am lost forever.

The Rocking-Horse Winner – D.H. Lawrence

Beginning: There was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck.

Ending: “But, poor devil, poor devil, he’s best gone out of a life where he rides his rocking horse to find a winner.”

The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Ernest Hemingway

Beginning: “The marvellous thing is that it’s painless,” he said. “That’s how you know when it starts.”

Ending: Outside the tent the hyena made the same strange noise that had awakened her. But she did not hear him for the beating of her heart.

The Chrysanthemums – John Steinbeck

Beginning: The high grey-flannel fog of winter closed off the Salinas Valley from the sky and from all the rest of the world.

Ending: “It will be enough if we can have wine. It will be plenty.” She turned up her coat collar so he could not see that she was crying weakly – like an old woman.

A Good Man Is Hard to Find – Flannery O’Connor

Beginning: The grandmother didn’t want to go to Florida. She wanted to visit some of her connections in east Tennessee and she was seizing at every chance to change Bailey’s mind.

Ending: “Shut up, Bobby Lee,” The Misfit said. “It’s no real pleasure in life.”

To Set Our House in Order – Margaret Laurence

Beginning: When the baby was almost ready to be born, something went wrong and my mother had to go to the hospital two weeks before the expected time.

Ending: I could not really comprehend these things, but I sensed their strangeness, their disarray. I felt that whatever God might love in this world, it was certainly not order.

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