Toasted Cheese 17:1

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The March 2017 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Holly Day, Liz Dolan, John Grey, Michael Paul Hogan, Salvatore Marici & Sam Payne; flash by Jenny T.H. Chiu, Becca B. Jenkins, Zack Peercy & Michael Snyder; and fiction by Michelle McMillan-Holifield, Gwenda Major, David McVey & Kathryn Pallant.

TC 17:1 also includes the Dead of Winter Writing Contest winning stories by Ellis Sinclair, Catherine J. Link & Red Lagoe.

At Candle-Ends, Shelley Carpenter reviews Jesus and Magdalene by João Cerqueira, and Bill Lockwood reviews Sure Things and Last Chances by Lou Gaglia.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Theryn “Beaver” Fleming.

The cover image is by torbakhopper on Flickr, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!

Toasted Cheese 16:4

The December 2016 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Darren C. Demaree, Rose Knapp, D.W. Moody & Timothy Pilgrim; flash by Timothy Bastek, Isaac Buckley, Lori Cramer, Travis Keys, Michelle S. Lee & Tim Love; and fiction by Nancy Christie, William Locke Hauser, Jay Merill & Dacia Price.

TC 16:4 also includes the fall Three Cheers and a Tiger Writing Contest winning stories by Robert Walton, Valerie Lunt, Christina De La Rocha & R.J. Snowberger.

At Candle-Ends, Shelley Carpenter reviews Buried Gold by Bill Lockwood, and Bill Lockwood reviews The Last Cadillac by Nancy Sullivan.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Stephanie “Baker” Lenz.

The cover image is by H is for Home on Flickr, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!

Toasted Cheese 16:3

The September 2016 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Richard Dinges, Marchell Dyon, Theresa Kelly, Marc Livanos, Lauren Scavo & Judith Taylor; flash by Jeff Bakkensen & Stephanie Gail; fiction by David E. Grubb, Kathy Mansfield, Michael Retzer & Gina Sakalarios-Rogers; and creative nonfiction by Autumn Shah.

TC 16:3 also includes the A Midsummer Tale Writing Contest winning stories by Sarah Evans, Heather Finnegan & Gail Webber.

At Candle-Ends, Shelley Carpenter reviews Not For Art Nor Prayer by Darren C. Demaree.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Theryn “Beaver” Fleming.

The cover image is by Benny Mazur on Flickr, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!

Toasted Cheese 16:2

The June 2016 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Colin Dardis, Bobbi Sinha-Morey & Diane Webster; flash by Andrew Bertaina, Jhilam Chattaraj, Greg Metcalf & Tara Roeder; and fiction by Sharon L. Dean, Karl Harshbarger, Isabel S. Miles & Steve Passey.

TC 16:2 also includes the Spring 2016 Three Cheers and a Tiger Writing Contest winning stories by Meredith Bateman, Brian Behr Valentine & Erin McDougall.

At Candle-Ends, Shelley Carpenter reviews Feeding by Cody L. Stanford and Lou Gaglia reviews Crossing the Lines by Tony Press.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Stephanie “Baker” Lenz.

The cover image is by James on Flickr, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!

Fictional Fête: 15 Fantasy Guests

Absolute BlankBy Shelley Carpenter (Harpspeed)

Dear Fiction Readers and Writers,

Do you remember that cool TV show from the 1970s—Fantasy Island? For some of you this may be a way-before-your-time era, but for the rest of you, you might recall a Mr. Roarke and his cute little friend, Tattoo, who entertained guests in their fantasy pursuits. They would wait at the Fantasy Island dock in their matching white tuxedos at the start of every episode. “The Plane! The Plane!” I imagined in my own kid-way what my fantasy would be should I pay the million-dollar guest ticket price for my fantasy to become real. I had many fantasies (which I won’t share!), but sadly I never could afford the million-dollar fee.

I’ve grown up since then and have discovered that there are other ways to a good fantasy that are “off-island.” Here’s one of mine: I’m having a small fête this month. I’ve decided to invite only the people I like: good and bad, famous and infamous alike. The thing is that the guests are fictitious characters from a few of my favorite novels. (I have many favorites!) The venue is my imagination.

Bon Appetite!
Harpspeed

P.S. In case you are curious, my character guest list follows:

Background Image: Jesper Larsen-Ledet/Flickr (CC-by-nc-sa)

Background Image: Jesper Larsen-Ledet/Flickr (CC-by-nc-sa)

  1. Icy Sparks (from Icy Sparks by Gwyn Hyman Rubio)

Ten-year-old orphan Icy Sparks is from 1950s Kentucky who has an interesting trait: uncontrollable tics and some of the most outrageous cursing I have ever heard. She is someone who really says what she thinks. Icy doesn’t know it but she has Tourette Syndrome. I like her very much because she is a precocious, quirky character who changes the other characters in her story. I would vote for her if she ran for president.

  1. Mina Murray (from Dracula by Bram Stoker)

Wilhelmina ”Mina” Murray is a remarkable character and a marvel, she (I can’t recall if I’m remembering Winona Ryder from the 1990s film version) and that modern fancy-dancy typewriter that she uses to type personal letters to her fiancée, Jonathan, who’s under the impression that he’s the hero in Stoker’s horror story—when in fact it is Mina who is the real star. If you don’t believe me—ask Dracula. Mina’s character marks the rise of the modern female detective. If I go missing, please call Mina. Posthaste!

  1. Dustfinger (from Inkheart by Cornelia Funke)

Dustfinger is a supporting character that I followed in Funke’s three-volume story, Inkheart. He is a tragic and talented character who can breathe fire and curiously is also a reluctant hero. He has his own agenda but puts it aside to help the other protagonists. Still, Dustfinger can be unreliable and is sometimes a curmudgeon. Aren’t we all at some time? I enjoyed his dry wit and actor Paul Bettany’s very human portrayal of this complicated character in the film version, too. I think Dustfinger would amaze my guests with his special skills, but I won’t pay him until the show is over!

  1. Hig
  2. Bangley
  3. Jasper (from The Dog Stars by Peter Heller)

Hig is the main character in Peter Heller’s post-apocalyptic story, The Dog Stars. Hig is optimistic, philosophical, and loves nature. He flies around in a small Cessna plane with his faithful dog, Jasper, looking for signs of life and renewal all the while quoting Whitman and Johnny Cash. I think I met my literary soulmate in Heller’s story, if that is possible. If I invite him to my dinner party he will probably bring Jasper and his cranky friend, Bangley, who balances Hig’s optimism with his self-righteous mistrust of everyone and everything and whom I also like very much. You can’t invite one without inviting the other. It wouldn’t be very kind with the lack of people in their lonely world and limited opportunity for socializing. There is plenty of room at my table, and besides, who doesn’t love a good argument with their dinner? Please pass the **** salt!

  1. Mary Beth Mayfair (from The Witching Hour by Ann Rice)

Remind me to warn my guests that Mary Beth is a witch. (Some people are squeamish about that kind of thing.) Not the pointed black hat kind but rather the modern-world kind of witch. She comes from a long line of witches. You could say that it is the family business. I don’t like everyone in her family, but I do like her. She is very kind to strangers and children and exceptionally talented in bilocation and managing money. (Did I mention that her family are millionaires?) In fact, if she ever gives you money, she’ll tell you to spend it quick because somehow coin or cash always return to their place of origin be it Mary Beth’s coat pocket or beaded purse. She’s the bee’s knees for sure! Wouldn’t she be fun to go shopping with?

  1. Laura Ingalls Wilder (from The Little House Books by Laura Ingalls Wilder)

I know what you are thinking—but how can I not invite Laura? She is one of my oldest character-friends. Laura is a protagonist in her own life story that is truly memoir. Heck, they even made a TV series about her life. There’s that, and the fact that she was a big influence on me both personally and professionally. I quite figuratively and literally grew up with her. Her stories kept me company and occupied me on many a rainy day, during the long, boring, sometimes tumultuous middle years up through my teens and beyond. I caught up with her again in my twenties and later again in the classroom. Laura was one of my icons in children’s literature and has earned her velvet chair at my table. Subject closed. Icy will be her dinner partner. Maybe I’ll seat Jasper between them just for fun. Dogs are people, too, you know.

  1. Kirby Mazrachi (from The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes)

When I think of this character, the word tenacious pops up into my head. It’s a perfect adjective for her and if you’ve met her already you will understand and perhaps agree. You see, Kirby, single-handedly went after a time-traveling serial killer who targeted his victims when they were children. It gives me chills just thinking about her adversary, a serial killer—very creepy bedtime reading—and his modus operandi of stalking little girls and then returning for them when they were older. Kirby was one of his victims, but she survived him and decided to end this creep’s career. It wasn’t easy because she had to navigate in a crime story that was also science fiction. How do you track someone through time? Kirby found a way. I’ll seat her next to Mina. They have much in common. Don’t you agree?

  1. Mr. Rochester (from Jane Eyre by Emily Bronte)

Oh my stars! Edmund Charles Fairfax Rochester is wonderful! Maybe you have met him already if you have read Jane Eyre? He is an amazing character. He is probably the best friend anyone could ever have next to Jasper, of course. He is so charming and witty and interesting and mysterious in a beguiling, romantic way, of course. He’s the quintessential Romantic Era hero. He always says what he means and even though he can be aloof and secretive, he never lies… well, except maybe once to Jane, but really who could blame him? I will have to warn my guests not to get too attached to him. He’s already taken.

  1. Scarlett O’Hara (from Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell)

Katy Scarlett O’Hara seems to have a dark cloud hanging over her all the time. But the thing about Scarlett is that no matter how bad things get—and they do get pretty bad by modern standards—she loses her baby, her husband, her friends, and her home to the Yankees. Yet despite it all, Scarlett is always so very optimistic. After all, “Tomorrow is another day.” She doesn’t stay down long. She is an also an opportunist. What I call an optimistic-opportunist because she always finds a way to get what she wants or what she needs, by default—if you can call Rhett Butler a default. I wouldn’t. Anyway, she’s coming and hopefully not dressed in the living room drapes and she will be sitting between Bangley and Dustfinger. Oh what fun!

  1. Ralph Truit (from A Reliable Wife by Robert Goolrick)

As you might have guessed, I’m a sucker for romance and the American West. Ralph is, too, even though he says he isn’t. He’s the worst kind of romantic—hopeless! Anyway, he placed an advertisement in a Chicago newspaper in 1907 for an “honest and reliable wife” and got more than he bargained for when a woman named Catherine Land answered his advertisement and, let’s say, stole his heart among other things. But don’t feel too badly for Ralph. He had a plan of his own and Catherine was quite surprised, as was I. Ralph will be sitting next to Hig; they are both pretty even-tempered individuals and I think would get on well.

  1. Jim Quick (from Darling Jim by Christian Moerk Holt)

Jim is a storyteller who travels around Ireland, going from pub to pub on his Harley like a bad-boy from the bygone beat generation, seducing young women, stealing from them, and maybe killing them, too. Nobody is perfect! Not even Jim. However, Jim is a wonderful antagonist who picked the wrong women to prey on: three feisty Irish sisters who I think got the better of him—or was it the other way around? I’m hoping Jim will have some stories to share. Don’t worry! I will turn out his pockets when he arrives and hide the butter and steak knives before and after dinner. He’ll be sitting with Mina and Kirby. Those two will keep him out of trouble, no doubt.

  1. Harpspeed

As for me, my story is still being written.

  1. Reader

I left an empty seat for you, dearest Toasted Cheese reader and writer. Come fraternize.

Toasted Cheese 16:1

The March 2016 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Lana Bella, Jeff Burt, Theresa Kelly & Wern Hao See; flash by Melissa Ostrom & Sherry Welch; fiction by Brian Coughlan & Catherine Keenan; and creative nonfiction by Luanne Castle, Brett Peruzzi & Linda C. Wisniewski.

TC 16:1 also includes the 2015 Dead of Winter Writing Contest winning stories by Matthew Boyle, Robert James & John Howe.

At Candle-Ends, Shelley Carpenter reviews Poor Advice (and Other Stories) by Lou Gaglia.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Theryn “Beaver” Fleming.

The cover image is by Roger Penguino on Flickr, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!

Toasted Cheese 15:4

The December 2015 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Miki Byrne, Erin McIntosh, Sonnet Mondal & Lauren Scavo; flash by Paul Hetherington, Ajay Patri & Christina Sanders; fiction by James Butt, Kim Farleigh, Maithreyi Nandakumar & Deb Smith; and creative nonfiction by Theresa Kelly.

TC 15:4 also includes the Fall 2015 Three Cheers and a Tiger Writing Contest winning stories by Matthew Boyle, Mark Neyrinck & Clarissa Pattern.

At Candle-Ends, Shelley Carpenter reviews Undertow by Eric E. Wallace.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Theryn “Beaver” Fleming.

The cover image is by Allagash Brewing on Flickr, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!

Toasted Cheese 15:3

The September 2015 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Jan Ball, Sean Lause, JoAnn LoSavio, Jonathan Shipley, Angela Inez Vargas, Diane Webster & Marne Grinolds Wilson; flash by F. C. Brown Cloud & Claire Polders; fiction by Melodie Corrigall, Ryan Dempsey, Matthew Everett, Melanie Griffin & Judy Salz; and creative nonfiction by Marsa Laird, Mary Lewis & Emily Pifer.

TC 15:3 also includes the A Midsummer Tale Writing Contest winning stories by David Thom, Anais Jay & Susan Shiney.

At Candle-Ends, Erin Bellavia reviews A Red-Rose Chain by Seanan McGuire and Shelley Carpenter reviews Orangutanka: A Story in Poems by Margarita Engle.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Stephanie “Baker” Lenz.

The cover image is by jeffreyw on Flickr, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!

Toasted Cheese 15:2

The June 2015 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Carl Boon, Wayne F. Burke, Natasha S. Garnett, Lowell Jaeger, Erren Geraud Kelly & Kristina Spear; flash by Gretchen L. Dietz, Windy Lynn Harris, Jenny Irizary, Dorothy Mahoney & Roger McKnight; fiction by Rebecca T. Florisson, Louisa Adjoa Parker, Nancy Nau Sullivan & Bonnie Thompson; and creative nonfiction by Ron Riekki.

TC 15:2 also includes the Spring Three Cheers and a Tiger Writing Contest winning stories by Sarah R. Clayville, Urvashi Bohra & Tara Kenway.

At Candle-Ends, Shelley Carpenter reviews The Scholar,The Sphinx, and the Fang of Fenrir by A.R. Cook, A.R. Cook reviews Thirty Seconds by Heather MacPherson and Salvatore Marici reviews Temporary Champions by Darren C. Demaree.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Stephanie “Baker” Lenz.

The cover image is by Kimberly Appels, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!

Toasted Cheese 15:1

The March 2015 issue of Toasted Cheese features poetry by Holly Day, John Grey & Anne Britting Oleson; flash by Jill Boyles, Bradley Sides & Christopher T. White and fiction by Louis M. Abbey, Arika Elizenberry, Lane Kareska, Daniel Nazer, Marlene Olin, Jonathan Pauls & Tony Press.

TC 15:1 also includes the 2014 Dead of Winter Writing Contest winning stories by Erin McDougall, John Howe & Amelia Diamond.

At Candle-Ends, Shelley Carpenter reviews The Lightning Dreamer by Margarita Engle & Work to Do by Bob Zeanah and A.R. Cook reviews Swish Swirl & Sniff by Salvatore Marici.

This issue’s Snark Zone is by Stephanie “Baker” Lenz & Theryn “Beaver” Fleming.

The cover image is by Benny’s Chop House, with additional photos by photographers around the world, all of whom have generously made their work available for use under Creative Commons licenses. Please click through and check out their photostreams.

Congratulations to all. Happy reading!